Bond Falls


I ended up having some time away from work and decided to make a trip to a set of falls I’ve been wanting to visit for awhile. Now that I live an hour closer to them it makes the trip a little easier and I’m hoping to make another trip to them sometime during the summer. For all of these photos I had on my gear to go walking into the water to get different perspectives. For the colored photo with the reflection I ended up waist deep in the water. I was trying to get closer but it got too deep but I’m glad I was forced to get the photo I did as it allowed to capture the reflection in the foreground.

 

Behind the Falls – Monochrome Madness


Behind the Falls

Click on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 20mm
Aperture: f/2.5
Shutter Speed: 2.5s
ISO: 100

This is another photo I took of my trip to the falls last weekend. For this shot I ended up climbing up behind the falls. I took this photo with no intention of keeping it but after I got it on my computer I wish I would have taken more time to get a different perspective. Maybe I’ll just have to go back and do that. This is also my submission for Monochrome Madness hosted on Leanne Cole’s blog. I may have not made the cutoff though so it might not be on her blog post.

In the Mist


In the Mist

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Focal Length: 16mm
Aperture: f/14
Shutter Speed: 120 seconds
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

I have found that trying to get a shot close to falls is more difficult than it seems. Especially if you want to do a long exposure. The reason why? There’s a lost of mist that comes up. Hoya makes some HD2 filters that repel water though so I’m hoping to get them at some point. Although I did have some mist on my ND filter during this shot, I found that when converting to B&W it isn’t as distracting as it is in color. To me it almost gives the impression that I am there feeling the mist on my face as I’m next to the falls.

Broken Ice


Broken Ice

Click on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 28mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/4000
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

Part of photography is experimenting with different lighting, angles, focus points, and compositions. There was so much snow from last winter and so cold that it all stuck around until spring. Usually there are a few warmer days throughout the winter to allow for some snow melt. Because of the amount of snow left around at spring and the sudden warm-up, there was a lot of melting occurring all at once. These falls were running a bit too fast for my liking at the time. It was difficult trying to find a good photo. I decided to try and find something that didn’t concentrate on the water but more of the ice or snow that was along the river.

Tri-Falls


Tri-Falls

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Focal Length: 105mm
Aperture: f/32
Shutter Speed: 20 seconds
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

A nice things about these falls were that there were so many unique angles and vantage points that  I was able to create many different photos from them. I also had an advantage to be able to get farther away from the falls and use my macro lens to shoot them and see how it turned out. The wide angle lens was nice for getting up close, but the macro lens worked nice by allowing me to get some more unique shots where I could easily isolate a specific section of the falls. It’s amazing how you can make a place look by just shooting a small section of it. In some cases you can make a place look much better than it actually is. In this case the falls were just as a whole were just as nice as the photos I got.

Changing Focus Changes Perspective


Peaceful ReflectionsThe next time you go out and shoot, try to find interesting subjects both in the foreground and the background and then take a photo with one in focus and then the other. In order to do this you may need to find a foreground subject you can get close to in order to create a more shallow DoF to isolate the subject. As you can see in the above photo I have focused on the rocks in the foreground leaving the waterfalls in the background out of focus enough to not be distracting, but yet allowing the viewer to still tell what they are.

In the photo below, I have put the focus on the waterfalls instead which gives a different look to the same scene. Although they are framed just slightly different, I was able to still use the same area to get two very unique photos that can hold their own. One may have a preference for one over the other, but when it comes down to it, if you were to just view one or the other, they are both able to make nice photos.

Vibrant Reflections

For me they both give a nice relaxing peaceful feel to them. If you shoot like this and try to choose one to keep over the other, try looking at them as different photos rather than which is better than the other. Even though both photos technically contain the same elements, the focus on them make them unique photos. I hope that if you keep this in mind it will help you capture a shot just by changing the subject you are focusing on to see how it turns out.

Tiered


TieredClick on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 16mm
Aperture: f/16
Shutter Speed: 10 seconds
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

These were a wonderful set of falls that I had a great time photographing. I also tried different things that I’ll be posting some tips about from other photos when I get the time. I’ve still got plenty of winter photos to post but I’ve decided to break away from that for the time being to post photos that I’ve been taking over the summer so far. I can’t wait until spring next year when there’s still some snow but these falls are running to get some winter/spring photos. I’ll probably visit these falls a couple times throughout the winter to see how they transform through freezing and thawing. Should be interesting!

Among the Rocks


Among the Rocks

Click on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 18mm
Aperture: f/16
Shutter Speed: 90 seconds
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

I took a photo similar to this but behind grass and at a little bit different angle. I liked this photo as well as it gives a view point along some of the rocks. One of the next investments I’m going to make is some waders or longer waterproof boots so I can do more shots from within the water. I always find that I’d like to either cross over to the other side or get to a vantage point that difficult to do so without walking in the water.

Thought I would also share some good news. I went to a photography seminar last night for landscape photography and ended up winning a door prize for Perfectly Clear LR plugin at athentech.com. I’m excited to see how it works and hoping that it’ll make a difference. If I don’t like it, then at least I’m not out the money. I’m hoping I do though. For $199 I would think it should do a good job.

Minnehaha Falls


Minnehaha Falls

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Focal Length: 105mm
Aperture: f/7.1
Shutter Speed: 1/250
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

I managed to get up close to the falls and get a couple long exposure shots with a wide angle lens, but there was so much mist coming off of these falls that the photos just didn’t turn out at all. I ended up compromising with the falls instead and used my macro lens at a farther distance and ended up stitching together 3 landscape shots to get what seems like a portrait shot. This was a nice park to visit, although I don’t know if I’ll make it back again. I did enjoy the morning I went. I think that these falls run all year round as this small river goes into the Mississippi right in the middle of the Twin Cities.

Over the Falls


Over the FallsClick on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 28mm
Aperture: f/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/4000
ISO: 100
Format: FX (Full Frame)

This photo was taken of a nice little area with some falls. This was when spring was just around the corner. You can see the ice is broken up and if you look closely you can see how rough the water is going over the edge of the falls. Right now there’s no water running down these falls as it gets its water from runoff from the nearby fields. It would be nice if it ran year round, but I think it gives us photographers a chance to capture it at different points where it’s completely frozen in the winter, running wild in the early spring, slowly going in the middle of the summer, and nearly dried up towards the beginning of fall.

Monochrome Madness – Free Flowing


Free Flowing

Click on the image to view a high res version.

Focal Length: 16mm
Aperture: f/16
Shutter Speed: 10 seconds
ISO: 100

I got up about an hour prior to sunrise at 4 am in order to make it to this location not to get any sunrise photos but to make it there before the harsh light from the sun created reflections on the water. These falls weren’t very tall but the amount of ledges made them very interesting. So far I think I have enjoyed shooting these falls the most, although I haven’t shot that many yet. There were a lot of other interesting things around this area that I wanted to photograph but didn’t have much time to work with so I’ll be looking forward to another trip out here to get those shots when I can find the time.

This is also my submission for the monochrome madness challenge on Leanne Cole’s site. You can view this along with many other submissions by visiting her site on Wednesday after she posts them. Always a lot of great photos.